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Valentine’s Day Week

Valentine’s Day Week in Room 209 was eventful in many ways! We took a short break from our Winter and Polar Inquiry to focus on some other learning adventures. We added in some Valentine’s Day-inspired invitations to play, we visited Winterlude as a class, we held a “Colours of Love” Healthy Snack class party and we participated in the school Dance-a-Thon – whew!

Join us in reflecting back on memories of this exciting week!

Valentine’s Day-Inspired Invitations to Play

Although I’m not big on themes, I don’t mind throwing in more “themey” activities every so often so long as they are culturally meaningful to the students, are open-ended in nature and do not flood the entire program or room. The children in our room almost always have options and have many opportunities to practice making choices. Alongside the Valentines Day activities you see in these pictures, were many other activities or invitations to play and learn that coincided with our Winter & Polar Inquiry (those photos will be reserved for the following post!). In my opinion, it really is all about balance when it comes to planning and setting up invitations in your classroom. You want them to reflect the interests, values, realities and abilities of your learners. If you’re going to present something that is not culturally-familiar to the children, you need to introduce it properly and with sensitivity and ensure they understand your reasoning for presenting it to them. In my case, the children in my room all celebrate Valentine’s Day and are quite familiar with it. Moreover, they all expressed significant interest in Valentine’s Day, in preparing for it and in looking forward to it, which is why these activities ‘made sense’ for us. Of course, each classroom is different.

To clarify for those who aren’t familiar, “invitations to play/learn” are simply displays of toys, play materials, sensory tubs/bins/tables, loose parts, art materials, etc. organized in inviting ways that attract children and provoke creativity and open-ended play.

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Behold: Our classroom Love Potion! Children were presented with this new sensory invitation early in the week to bring in the spirit of Valentine’s Day, which is coming up that weekend. Inside the bin was pink coloured water, red and pink water beads, plastic heart-shaped accessories, heart-shaped boxes, a heart-shaped muffin container and heart-patterned buckets.

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The City Inquiry Deepens

Combinatory Play’ and the Creative Process

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I’d like to set the tone for this post by highlighting something once said by the amazing, Mr. Albert Einstein: “Play is the highest form of research”. Einstein is credited for having strong feelings regarding the importance of liberal arts within the education system and for his belief that the secret to true genius lies in ‘combinatory play’ – the process of creativity. The more one partakes in joyful play, the more she is able to combine and recombine a collection of new knowledge, information, memories, inspiration, and existing ideas in order to produce new ideas. If you’d like to read more on this, you can check it out on BrainPickings. Within our classroom, children are given many opportunities to play and are also given the tools and guidance to learn how to learn. Discover what we’ve been up to this week…

A City-Sized Inquiry!

Our City Inquiry continues to deepen through many explorations and learning experiences. Although you can’t really read the writing or see the photos, I wanted to give you a glimpse of our city inquiry board that is in the works. Come on in and see it close up!

Documentation boards/panels like this, have several purposes. First of all, they make the students’ and educators’ thinking visible and showcase the processes and pathways occurring throughout the room around a certain inquiry (in this case, the city). A shared understanding is created and ongoing dialogue and reflection is promoted through the display of the photos, work samples and captions. Documentation panels allow educators to celebrate the rights of individual learners (perspectives and talents are vast within every class) as well as make it clear to the children that they are being honoured and respected for having ownership over their learning (the children themselves, decide which direction to take the inquiry based on their interests, wonderings and experiences). By highlighting the inquiry, making it clear what is happening and where it started from (the beginning experiences or thoughts that began the inquiry), children also feel a sense of accountability over their own learning and the learning of their peers.

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