Tag Archives: mural

Polar Learning Flourishes!

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Einstein understood that the ability to imagine is what opens our minds up to possibilities we never considered before. When we imagine the so-called impossible and seek to discover or uncover new truths, we create new knowledge that leads us to more questions. The reality is that we, as a human race, are never finished knowing and understanding all that there ever was, is or will be. We need to keep that fire to search alive by continuing to ask questions. This habit of mind, I believe, is best developed young so that our children – our future – can grow and develop into thinkers, explorers and innovators and go beyond the acceptance of every day facts at face value. This sense of imagination and disposition for questioning is something I aim to instill in my students as young learners. Even if all I do is plant a seed…

Learning About the Inuit Peoples & Culture

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As our Polar Inquiry continued to deepen and as we looked at more and more books that contained pictures or stories about the people who live in the Arctic, the children became fascinated and we became knee deep in new questions that neither I nor Madison could answer.

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Welcome to Kindergarten City

And so it has arrived… The unveiling of weeks’ worth of learning, discovering and inquiring about the city.

Behold, Kindergarten City.

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This photo was taken in 3 shots because of the enormous size of our mural and the angle at which I was able to stand in the hallway. The only way to truly take in the full effect and true beauty that this piece has to offer is to come for a visit and admire it in person.

This photo simply does not do it justice. I encourage parents to come in, read the documentation panels that explain how our inquiry emerged and the path it took, find their sons and daughters within the city and take some photos.

How was it made? Over the last couple of weeks, as you know, we have been studying the city – exploring what makes a city a ‘city’, how it compares to the countryside, what types of structures exist within a city and what kinds of places make a city run. Students were then able to brainstorm a long list of places: hospitals, airports, dentist offices, grocery stores, coffee shops, pet shelters, schools – the list goes on. Both classes of SKs then got to choose which place/building they wanted to create for our mural. Some children did some extra tasks such as painting the backdrop. Students used construction paper, Sharpie markers, crayons and markers to create their buildings. We discussed adding texture (e.g., bricks), the use of signage, aesthetic additions (e.g., garden in the front) and other details (e.g., window and door details). To create the ‘residents’, children designed their bodies and we glued photos of their faces on top so they could find themselves in the City.

All of the children far surpassed our expectations and worked for long, concentrated periods of time on creating quality pieces for the mural. Madison and I purposefully did not make any of the colour or style choices for the children nor did we do any of the cutting or printing. We wanted their individual abilities and personalities to shine through and make it something they could be proud of themselves for. We love how each building is so unique and allows us a glimpse into each child’s imagination and collection of knowledge. I think the very fact that it was not handled as a prescribed cookie-cutter craft activity and that the pieces are not perfectly [teacher-cut] shapes is what makes it so magical and full of character and charm.

We have received so many compliments from administration, teachers, students and parents and have been so proud to say that it is a true student-made piece of art. We hope that you like it and will come in to have a peak!

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Learning About ‘The City’, Learning About Life

Happy Thanksgiving Weekend everyone!

Something to Contemplate…

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Carlina Rinaldi is the President of Reggio Children – the International Center for the Defense and Promotion of the Rights and Potentials of All Children – and has worked closely with Loris Malaguzzi, pioneer of the Reggio Emilia Approach to teaching and learning (the approach that inspires my own work). You can learn more about the Center and this approach by visiting www.reggiochildren.it

Essentially, this quote captures nicely, how adults – parents and educators alike – need to slow down and simply listen and observe children. Rather than demand responses from children, we need to give them the time they need to process, ponder and ask questions, themselves. Likewise, rather than immediately provide answers to children’s questions, we need to give them the time and space necessary for them to come up with an array of possible solutions and to consider where and how they can search for answers that make the most sense to them. Giving children these opportunities sets them up for a future of lifelong learning and teaches them how to function in a 21st Century world where so much information is available. By doing so, they learn to consider multiple perspectives and solutions, to sift through those possibilities and to choose which ones speak to them. Like my website’s slogan states, it is our duty as those that watch and guide our future generation, to find ways to ignite the spark for learning within children. This approach empowers children in becoming courageous learners – learners open to taking risks and appreciating the various pathways to seeking answers. You can read more about this within my post, A Little Bit of Courage

Now, keeping all of that in mind, onto this week’s learning…

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