Category Archives: Murals and Displays

Spring Brings A Worm Inquiry

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Spring Brings a Worm Inquiry

April 2015 revealed the budding beginnings of a new inquiry. From all our talk on caring for the Earth, the benefits of compost and producing nutrient-rich soil, we have begun to wonder about worms and other mini-beasts. I asked the children if they would like to study worms close up by having worms in the classroom and it was a resounding, “YES!!!”. Madison and I decided we could have our very own earth worm tank to enhance our learning. If you’ve read my earlier posts, you know that I did this last year and the children not only loved it but also learned so much from it! Even those who, at first, were timid about touching the worms ended up learning the values of bravery and trying new things.

This post will showcase our journey throughout our Worm Inquiry and reveal how it transformed into a broader study of insects. As always, our scientific investigations were used as a means to also tap into math, language and the arts, allowing us to cover many curriculum expectations. The big idea that I wanted the children to understand was that although worms are small, they are indeed very important to the soil, the plants, animals and to us! I can definitely say that this goal was well reached.

Enjoy!

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Polar Learning Flourishes!

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Einstein understood that the ability to imagine is what opens our minds up to possibilities we never considered before. When we imagine the so-called impossible and seek to discover or uncover new truths, we create new knowledge that leads us to more questions. The reality is that we, as a human race, are never finished knowing and understanding all that there ever was, is or will be. We need to keep that fire to search alive by continuing to ask questions. This habit of mind, I believe, is best developed young so that our children – our future – can grow and develop into thinkers, explorers and innovators and go beyond the acceptance of every day facts at face value. This sense of imagination and disposition for questioning is something I aim to instill in my students as young learners. Even if all I do is plant a seed…

Learning About the Inuit Peoples & Culture

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As our Polar Inquiry continued to deepen and as we looked at more and more books that contained pictures or stories about the people who live in the Arctic, the children became fascinated and we became knee deep in new questions that neither I nor Madison could answer.

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Christmas, Hanukkah and Much More!

“We all should know that diversity makes for a rich tapestry, and we must understand that all the threads of the tapestry are equal in value no matter what their color.” – Maya Angelou

To celebrate the holiday season in Room 209, we did our very best to be as inclusive as possible and to expose the children to new and different cultural celebrations including: Christmas, Hanukkah, Eid and Kwanzaa. The month flew by and I admit, with all of the excitement and projects, I got a little behind on my photo taking. Read this post to see what I did manage to collect and to get a taste for how our holiday season celebrations and learning played out.

Starting Off the Month…

Elf on the Shelf: Requesting an Elf from Santa

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After telling the children that I had once heard if you requested an elf from Santa, he might send one, they were excited to give it a try! I did an interactive writing lesson with both classes in which we wrote a letter to Santa, asking him for an elf. We used our sound board to remember letter sounds as we went along. After both letters were complete, I put them both in the mail addressed to Santa.

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Processes, Projects & Possibilities

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Well… it’s finished! The project we’ve worked so long and hard on during the month of December and into January: Our space mural! Behold weeks and weeks of learning all rolled into one beautiful masterpiece to showcase not only the knowledge gained, but also the thinking done, the problems solved, and the creativity exercised. Roosevelt truly summed it up so nicely for us. The effort put in is definitely important and where the magic happens. However, when the final result is as wonderful as this – well, the satisfaction is like no other. I think I can speak on behalf of the children when I say: We are SO proud of our mural!

Come and see it in person! From the intricate and captivating multi-media piece of art made by the children… to the facts posted around the mural (in the children’s own words) to enhance each of the features… to the photos, captions and descriptions that document the evolution of our Space and Gravity Inquiry… you will not be disappointed!

So just how did we get here?

A recap and some updates are in order!

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Fallin’ for Fall

The past two weeks can be best summed up using the following quote by marine biologist and conservationist, Rachel Carson:

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In addition to all of the wonderful learning related to our city inquiry, children were presented with a provocation of fall-related items. In our sensory bin, Madison and I put gourds, pumpkins, dried maize/corn, strawberry corn, stones, pine cones and magnifying glasses. At first, only clipboards with paper and markers were set beside the table to encourage recording of exploring, wondering and representing. As you will see in the photos, these two clipboards were not enough and this centre seeped onto other tables and even onto the floor as children needed more room to do their exploring.

Now, if there’s one thing one would need to know about teaching young learners, it is this: you can make almost anything sound amazing and fun if you present it that way and truly believe it yourself. Many people would assume children would find this learning centre boring and be done with it after just a few minutes. By modeling our excitement to look closely at the items, admire their imperfect beauty, and draw/write about what we see, many children kept busy with the centre for days (and weeks!). I told the children that they were all scientists because they were doing exactly what scientists do by observing, examining and asking questions that lead to discovery. The children LOVED learning that they were real scientists. Have a look at what happened…

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Welcome to Kindergarten City

And so it has arrived… The unveiling of weeks’ worth of learning, discovering and inquiring about the city.

Behold, Kindergarten City.

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This photo was taken in 3 shots because of the enormous size of our mural and the angle at which I was able to stand in the hallway. The only way to truly take in the full effect and true beauty that this piece has to offer is to come for a visit and admire it in person.

This photo simply does not do it justice. I encourage parents to come in, read the documentation panels that explain how our inquiry emerged and the path it took, find their sons and daughters within the city and take some photos.

How was it made? Over the last couple of weeks, as you know, we have been studying the city – exploring what makes a city a ‘city’, how it compares to the countryside, what types of structures exist within a city and what kinds of places make a city run. Students were then able to brainstorm a long list of places: hospitals, airports, dentist offices, grocery stores, coffee shops, pet shelters, schools – the list goes on. Both classes of SKs then got to choose which place/building they wanted to create for our mural. Some children did some extra tasks such as painting the backdrop. Students used construction paper, Sharpie markers, crayons and markers to create their buildings. We discussed adding texture (e.g., bricks), the use of signage, aesthetic additions (e.g., garden in the front) and other details (e.g., window and door details). To create the ‘residents’, children designed their bodies and we glued photos of their faces on top so they could find themselves in the City.

All of the children far surpassed our expectations and worked for long, concentrated periods of time on creating quality pieces for the mural. Madison and I purposefully did not make any of the colour or style choices for the children nor did we do any of the cutting or printing. We wanted their individual abilities and personalities to shine through and make it something they could be proud of themselves for. We love how each building is so unique and allows us a glimpse into each child’s imagination and collection of knowledge. I think the very fact that it was not handled as a prescribed cookie-cutter craft activity and that the pieces are not perfectly [teacher-cut] shapes is what makes it so magical and full of character and charm.

We have received so many compliments from administration, teachers, students and parents and have been so proud to say that it is a true student-made piece of art. We hope that you like it and will come in to have a peak!

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Inquiry of a Castle (Part 2)

Let the Building Begin!

After the art show, we had the time to focus more on our giant castle. We had also collected enough larger boxes and felt confident that the students were ready to construct a castle that could reflect their learning. Different students contributed at various times along the process and we could proudly say it was a collaborative process in which all students thinking and skills were involved.

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Top Row: Children painted boxes black and stamped grey bricks on with a rectangular foam block. Bottom Left: It was sometimes difficult to get this boy to participate in classroom activities and we were looking to find something he could connect with. The creation of the giant castle sparked his interest more than anything I had seen all year. He painted boxes outside in the hall for three days straight. Bottom Right: Children went inside of the castle to consider the arrangement of the boxes and what details needed to be added. Here, one boy runs in with his plan that he has drawn on a piece of paper.

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A Worm Inquiry (Part 2)

Picking up from where I left off in which I explained where this worm inquiry came from and how I prepared for it (see the last post), I will now describe what happened when the children were introduced to the worms. Enjoy!

Engaging Students at the Science/Worm Centre:

My prized worm tank was complete and ready for its worm inhabitants. This new provocation was, at first, hidden from students when they came into the classroom the next morning. I started off reminding them of their wonderings yesterday about why there were no worms in the soil at the mud table. I told them I wanted to read them a story about a worm to get them thinking more about worms. I read, “Diary of a Worm” by Doreen Cronin.

As we read the story, certain questions arose about whether or not the book was giving us real facts about worms. Initially the students stated that the book was fiction because they could tell it was more like a story and did not have a table of contents like the non-fiction books we have looked at did. As students asked questions or made predictions as to whether or not something in the story was a real fact about worms, I recorded their thinking on chart paper. I was surprised when some children talked about worms being good for the soil and the environment! This was something I kept note of because it told me that some children had a fairly good background on worms. The chart paper became quite crowded and messy but the children know from me reminding them, that thinking is sometimes ‘messy’ and not always ‘neat and tidy’.

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Our ‘busy paper’ as we wondered and talked about worms.

After the story, we review our thoughts from the chart paper. I asked the children how we could find out the answers to our questions as well as find out more about worms. The children are becoming very familiar with this process of “researching” or “exploring”. Some answers included: Look on the iPad or iPhone, look on the computer or Internet, ask Scientists in Sweden (yes, Sweden!), look in non-fiction books, and finally…. look, study and feel worms by bringing real worms into the class. A few children actually suggested this last idea. A few children immediately stated that this would be impossible because there’s still snow outside and the ground is frozen. Other children brought up that fisherman have to buy their worms from a story so maybe we could buy worms from a store too. The children discussed a possible plan of action with one another for a few minutes while I left the circle to go grab the tank.

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